Thursday, February 28, 2013

Free eBook Feature: Tax Guide for Health Savings Account

Free Kindle eBook: Tax Guide for Health Savings Account
Author: Alexander Schaper
Business, Taxation, Accounting 
Price: $0.00 (February 28 to March 4)

Book Description: Tax Guide for Health Savings Account


Qualified medical expenses. For HSA, MSA, FSA, and HRA purposes, a medicine or drug will be a qualified medical expense only if the medicine or drug:

1. Requires a prescription,
2. Is available without a prescription (an over-the-counter medicine or drug) and you get a prescription for it, or
3. Is insulin.

This applies to amounts paid after 2010. However, it does not apply to amounts paid in 2011 for medicines or drugs purchased before January 1, 2011. Various programs are designed to give individuals tax advantages to offset health care costs. This publication explains the following programs.

• Health savings accounts (HSAs).
• Medical savings accounts (Archer MSAs and Medicare Advantage MSAs).
• Health flexible spending arrangements (FSAs).
• Health reimbursement arrangements (HRAs).

An HSA may receive contributions from an eligible individual or any other person, including an employer or a family member, on behalf of an eligible individual. Contributions, other than employer contributions, are deductible on the eligible individual's return whether or not the individual itemizes deductions. Employer contributions are not included in income. Distributions from an HSA that are used to pay qualified medical expenses are not taxed.

An Archer MSA may receive contributions from an eligible individual and his or her employer, but not both in the same year. Contributions by the individual are deductible whether or not the individual itemizes deductions. Employer contributions are not included in income. Distributions from an Archer MSA that are used to pay qualified medical expenses are not taxed.
A Medicare Advantage MSA is an Archer MSA designated by Medicare to be used solely to pay the qualified medical expenses of the account holder who is enrolled in Medicare. Contributions can only be made by Medicare. The contributions are not included in your income. Distributions from a Medicare Advantage MSA that are used to pay qualified medical expenses are not taxed.

A health FSA may receive contributions from an eligible individual. Employers may also contribute. Contributions are not includible in income. Reimbursements from an FSA that are used to pay qualified medical expenses are not taxed.
An HRA must receive contributions from the employer only. Employees may not contribute. Contributions are not includible in income. Reimbursements from an HRA that are used to pay qualified medical expenses are not taxed.

A health savings account (HSA) is a tax-exempt trust or custodial account that you set up with a qualified HSA trustee to pay or reimburse certain medical expenses you incur. You must be an eligible individual to qualify for an HSA.

No permission or authorization from the IRS is necessary to establish an HSA. When you set up an HSA, you will need to work with a trustee. A qualified HSA trustee can be a bank, an insurance company, or anyone already approved by the IRS to be a trustee of individual retirement arrangements (IRAs) or Archer MSAs. The HSA can be established through a trustee that is different from your health plan provider.
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